Man, 21, whose mother became a conspiracy theory influencer amid pandemic brands her ‘dangerous’

The son of a suspended anti-vaxxer nurse who doesn’t believe Covid-19 exists and sparked violent clashes at a mass rally of virus deniers in Trafalgar Square has branded her ‘dangerous’ and an ‘attention-seeker’.  

Sebastian Shemirani, 21, whose mother Kate Shemirani, 54, from East Sussex, has become notorious for spreading baseless conspiracy theories during the pandemic, said he no longer has a relationship with her and believes she’s ‘too far gone to be helped’.

Speaking to the BBC, Eton scholar Sebastian, who is currently in his final year studying at the London School of Economics, said he is concerned about the impact his mother’s claims could have on public health.

‘What she’s doing is dangerous,’ he said. ‘Thousands of people are taking her to be this source of truth and this saint, and I wish I could tell them all my mum is not the person that you think she is.

Mother-of-four Kate Shemirani, 54, from East Sussex, has become notorious for spreading baseless conspiracy theories during the pandemic

Kate's son Sebastian Shemirani, 21, said he no longer has a relationship with his mother and believes she's 'too far gone to be helped'

Kate's son Sebastian Shemirani, 21, said he no longer has a relationship with his mother and believes she's 'too far gone to be helped'

Kate’s son Sebastian Shemirani, 21, said he no longer has a relationship with his mother and believes she’s ‘too far gone to be helped’

‘She’s someone with a massive amount of self-interest and loves being the centre of attention.’

Mother-of-four Kate, a registered nurse of 35 years, is adamant that coronavirus is a hoax and has claimed its symptoms are linked to the roll-out of new 5G wireless technology. 

She has argued the upcoming Covid-19 vaccination is a political tool to gain access to and change people’s DNA, has likened lockdown restrictions to the Holocaust, and insisted dancing NHS nurses will ‘stand trial for genocide’.  

Kate is a headliner at anti-lockdown rallies, having joined conspiracy theorists David Icke and Piers Corbyn, older brother of former Labour leader Jeremy, at a protest in August and directed yobs to confront riot police whom she branded ‘dirty dogs’ and mocked for wearing face masks at a rally in September. 

Kate has argued the upcoming Covid-19 vaccination is a political tool to gain access to and change people's DNA, has likened lockdown restrictions to the Holocaust, and insisted dancing NHS nurses will 'stand trial for genocide'

Kate has argued the upcoming Covid-19 vaccination is a political tool to gain access to and change people’s DNA, has likened lockdown restrictions to the Holocaust, and insisted dancing NHS nurses will ‘stand trial for genocide’

While her outlandish claims saw her suspended by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) and kicked off Facebook and Instagram for spreading misinformation, her Twitter following has trebled.

Sebastian said he is speaking out now to prevent other people from being sucked in by conspiracy theorists.

‘This is her five minutes of fame,’ he said of his mother, whom he is now only in touch with via text messages.

‘I don’t want to be here talking about, you know… But it’s something I think we’ve got to do before these ideas get bigger and more people fall down the same route that she’s trying to take them down. You can only prevent it before it happens.’

He added: ‘I think she’s too far gone to be helped. I’m never going to have a relationship with my mum again, and that’s why it’s important that if someone else is coming to you and saying, “I’m starting to believe this stuff” – nip it in the bud, because it takes a couple of years to completely lose somebody. 

Sebastian said he is speaking out now to prevent other people from being sucked in by conspiracy theorists

Sebastian said he is speaking out now to prevent other people from being sucked in by conspiracy theorists

‘And when this is over in three or four years time, and everything she’s said is forgotten, and the global genocide hasn’t happened, people will forget about it.

‘But the disaster that goes on within my family and the relationships that she’s losing now, that stuff stays forever.’

Sebastian, whose father is Iranian, said he was shocked to see people with far-right views among his mother’s followers – and claimed they wouldn’t listen to her if they realised all of her children are mixed race.

‘She’s out there getting all this clout and attention from people who don’t think I should exist,’ he said.  

Speaking about his childhood, Sebastian – who left home at 17 – described it as ‘hell’, revealing he was frequently exposed to conspiracy theories.

At the end of August, Kate joined conspiracy theorists David Icke and Piers Corbyn, older brother of former Labour leader Jeremy, at a protest against coronavirus restrictions and plans for a Covid-19 vaccine

At the end of August, Kate joined conspiracy theorists David Icke and Piers Corbyn, older brother of former Labour leader Jeremy, at a protest against coronavirus restrictions and plans for a Covid-19 vaccine

‘It’s difficult to explain because we didn’t live in particularly economically difficult circumstances. We had a nice big house in a good town,’ he said.

‘[Mum would] start playing these YouTube videos for me about how the Rothschilds are planning to go live on a space station, how there’s going to be this mass genocide, stuff like that.

‘I’m 10, 11 years old and I’m bricking it. I can’t believe that the genocide is coming.’

Several weeks ago Sebastian told how his mother sent him a text message ordering him to listen to her or else he and his sister were ‘going to die’ due to a ‘CIA plot’ set to ‘kill half the UK population within five years’.  

When the BBC put her son’s claims to Kate, she didn’t respond to them directly; instead, she said: ‘From what I can see it would appear… a “conspiracy theorist” is actually now anyone who believes something other than what your controllers want them to believe. I find this deeply disturbing.’ 

From a postman’s daughter to the face of the UK’s anti-vaccination movement

Kate Shemirani, a postman’s daughter from Nottingham, left school before completing her A-levels and had several jobs, ranging from a factory floor to Argos and a bar in Spain.

After qualifying at Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1984, she supplemented her salary as a theatre nurse with modelling assignments. 

From 1990 to 1998 she worked as a long-haul BA air stewardess.

After her children were born, she briefly set up her own business administering Botox, fillers and peels.

It was only a diagnosis of breast cancer in 2012 that saw her perform a complete volte-face in terms of her attitude to conventional medicine.

After undergoing a double mastectomy and reconstruction, she refused chemotherapy on the advice of her then husband, himself a conspiracy theorist who worked in the City and believed 9/11 was an inside job.

Kate embarked on a fat-free, salt-free, sugar-free vegan regime including high doses of vitamins as well as 13 juices a day, five coffee enemas and mistletoe injected into her stomach. 

Nine years on and still largely following that regime, she has had no recurrence of disease. 

Now describing herself as a nutritionist after taking an online diploma, she recommends the same treatment to other cancer patients.

She is unperturbed by the fact that there are no clinical trials to support her recommendations and rebuts any attempt to provide evidence, with the counter-claim: ‘There are no studies in oncology that tell you that you are going to die if you don’t do the (chemotherapy) treatment.’

There is, however, an abundance of evidence showing cancer patients’ survival rates improve when they do have it. 

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