Amazon is launching a ‘try before you buy’ fashion service in the UK

Amazon Fashion is launching a “try before you buy” service in the UK following a successful trial in the US.

Named Prime Wardrobe, the scheme allows customers signed up to Amazon’s subscription service to order three to eight clothing items with no upfront charge and free delivery. 

Wardrobe shoppers are also offered a range of discounts depending on the number of items they choose to keep.

If they choose to keep items worth £100 or more they could save £5, while holding on to items worth £200 more will see a saving of £20.

Should customers decide not to keep some of the items ordered, they can be returned within seven days free of charge. 

Fashion brands available from the new Prime Wardrobe service include Calvin Klein, Levi’s, Miss Selfridge, New Look, Also, New Balance, LK Bennett, Vans and more.

“Fit is an important factor when it comes to buying clothes and shoes, and with Prime Wardrobe, Amazon Prime members can try their purchases in the comfort of their own home at no extra cost,” said Xavier Garambois, vice-president of Amazon Europe’s retail division.

The UK is the third country to join the service, which started in the US in June and launched in Japan last week.

However, it isn’t the first major retailer to offer a “try before you buy” scheme.

Last year, Asos partnered with Klarna Pay Later to allow its UK app customers to try any of the 85,000 products on its website at home and only pay for what they want to keep within 30 days of the order being dispatched. 

The Klarna Group, which is now one of Europe’s largest banks, has a growing number of retailers in its shop directory including Topshop, Beauty Bay, Burton, Dorothy Perkins, Evans, Finery, Lazy Oaf and Schuch. 

The new service is the online retailer’s latest push into the clothing market as it attempts to align itself with more traditional high street stores like John Lewis and Next.

Amazon only began selling clothing in the UK in 2008, and according to stockbroker Société Générale, has already built a market share of 4.6 per cent, not far behind Marks & Spencer. 

Next remains by far the biggest online seller of clothes, with 12.5% of the market, followed by John Lewis, Asos and eBay.

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